Apply Today

Automation & Robotics Technology

15.0613

(Associate of Applied Science Degree)


The Automation & Robotics Technology program offers a world-class education in a field that blends high-tech electronics with state-of-the-art mechanical and computer systems. In many industries today, and definitely in the future, electro-mechanical integration is and will be the main component of mass production. Skilled technicians will be needed to create, install and maintain these automated systems. The Automation & Robotics Technology program is accredited by the Association of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering (ATMAE).

The program prepares students for the work environment with course work focused on design and fabrication of individual piece-parts and flexible machining systems (FMS). This type of automation incorporates computer numerical control (CNC) machining centers, programmable robots, electronically controlled part handling/transfer systems and vision quality control monitoring instruments. This program is designed to provide a broad industrial and technological background for the student to pursue careers as entry-level CNC operators/programmers, electrical maintenance technicians, electronics technicians, machinists, or specialized automation technicians.

An optional eight-week internship is included in the summer semester between the first and second years. The student will perform outlined duties pertaining to their specific program of study.

This program is offered only in Mexico, Missouri, at the Advanced Technology Center.

Program Mission
The Automation & Robotics Technology program provides students with the technical and interpersonal skills and knowledge that qualify them to work as a technician in today's automated manufacturing industries.

Program Goals
The goals of the program are to assure that the student has the opportunity to:

  • Develop effective oral and written communication skills.
  • Develop knowledge and skills necessary to program, set-up, and operate manual and CNC machine tools.
  • Develop an analytic approach to problem solving and troubleshooting.
  • Demonstrate professional and safety minded practices required by industry standards.
  • Demonstrate technical competency in managing and sustaining automated robotic manufacturing cells.

Program Assessments

  • National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI)
  • Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP)

CORE CURRICULUM

Credit Hours

MAR

101

Introduction to Electricity

4

MAR

110

Mechanical and Fluid Power Transmission

3

MAR

118

Industrial Motors and their Controls

4

MAR

125

Applied Electronics

4

MAR

150

Machine Shop Fundamentals

4

MAR

175

Machine Tool Programming

4

MAR

204

PLC Programming

4

MAR

206

Industrial Robotics

4

MAR

208

Computer Aided Machining

4

MAR

211

Theory of Industrial Automation

2

MAR

215

Introduction to Quality Control

3

MAR

218

Computer Interfacing

3

MAR

221

Mechanical and Electronic Device Troubleshooting

3

MAR

231

CIM Applications

4

Optional

 

MAR

190

Internship I (Optional)

(4)

     

 

 

SUB-TOTAL

50-54

     

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

 

General Education Requirements

19

Must Include:

 

PHY 

101/102

College Physics

4

 

 

SUB-TOTAL

19

 

 

 

 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENT

BUS

125

Job Search Strategies

1

 

 

SUB-TOTAL

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

PROGRAM TOTAL

70-74

 

The following Machining Specialist and Electrical Specialist less than one-year certificate options have been designed for part-time students. The courses listed in these two less than one-year certificates will be offered in the same sequence and semester they are being taught for the full-time Automation & Robotics Technology program.

MACHINING SPECIALIST
15.0613
(Less than One-Year Certificate)

CORE CURRICULUM

Credit Hours 

MAR

150

Machine Shop Fundamentals

4

MAR

175

Machine Tool Programming

4

MAR

191

Machine Tool Operations

4

MAR

208

Computer Aided Machining

4

MAR

215

Introduction to Quality Control

3

   

SUB-TOTAL

19

     

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

CPP

101

Introduction to Microcomputer Usage

3

OR

   

CPP

102

Advanced Microcomputer Usage

 

AND

   

COM

101

English Composition

3

OR

   

COM

110

Honors Composition

 

OR

 

 

 

COM

111

Oral Communications

 

OR

 

 

 

COM

121

Public Speaking

 

     
   

SUB-TOTAL

6

     

GRADUATION REQUIREMENT

BUS

125

Job Search Strategies

1

   

SUB-TOTAL

1

     

 

 

PROGRAM TOTAL

26



ELECTRICAL SPECIALIST

15.0613
 (Less than One-Year Certificate) 

 CORE CURRICULUM

Credit Hours 

MAR

101

Introduction to Electricity

4

MAR

118

Industrial Motors and their Controls

4

MAR

125

Applied Electronics

4

MAR

204

PLC Programming

4

MAR

218

Computer Interfacing

3

 

 

SUB-TOTAL

19

     

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

CPP

101

Introduction to Microcomputer Usage

3

OR

 

 

 

CPP

102

Advanced Microcomputer Usage

 

AND

 

 

 

COM

101

English Composition

3

OR

 

 

 

COM

110

Honors Composition

 

OR

 

 

 

COM

111

Oral Communications

 

OR

 

 

 

COM

121

Public Speaking

 

 

 

SUB-TOTAL

6

     

GRADUATION REQUIREMENT

BUS

125

Job Search Strategies

1

 

 

SUB-TOTAL

1

     
   

PROGRAM TOTAL

26

MAR  101  Introduction to Electricity.  This course introduces and develops the concepts necessary for understanding the use of electrical components and circuitry.  Technical math including scientific notation, significant figures, unit conversions, beginning algebra and basic trigonometry will be introduced and developed throughout the course.  The first half of the semester is devoted to DC, the second to AC.  Prerequisite:  A “C” or higher in MAT 031 or satisfactory placement score into MAT 051 or higher.  4 credit hours.

MAR  103  Introduction to Photonics.  This course covers the fundamentals of photonics and optics, the history of the photonics industry, and an introduction to lasers and laser applications.  Photonics/laser safety and practices are discussed, emphasized and practiced.  Corequisite:  MAR 101.  3 credit hours.

MAR  105  Data Collection, Analysis and Reporting.  This course is designed to introduce students to crafting technical reports by using data analysis methods, similar to those required in industry.  This course is writing intensive and spreadsheet intensive, and will concentrate on correct writing style as well as clear and concise presentation of data and graphs.  1 credit hour.

MAR  110  Mechanical and Fluid Power Transmission.  This course includes mechanical power transmission topics such as brakes, clutches, gears, couplings, shafts, chains and sprockets, cams and bearings.  Hydraulic items include liquid properties, cylinders, motors, pumps, valves and math for proper sizing of components.  Pneumatic items include physical principles, cylinders, motors, compressors and control valves.  Simulation of circuits will be performed before any laboratory work is done.  Laboratory exercises are provided to enhance classroom topics.  3 credit hours.

MAR  118  Industrial Motors and their Controls.  This course introduces the students to various types of industrial motors and controls.  The student will identify, select, install/wire and troubleshoot three phase and single phase DC/AC motors and controls, including servo and stepper motors.  Laboratory exercises include designing and building control modules for machine integration.  Prerequisite:  MAR 101.  4 credit hours.

MAR  121  Geometric Optics.  This course is designed to teach the student the theory of light as a geometric ray.  The laws of reflection and refraction from mathematical, graphical and experimental aspects are studied.  Computers are used as an aid for graphical and computational requirements.  Prerequisite:  MAR 103.  2 credit hours.

MAR  123  Wave Optics.  This course covers the theory of light as a wave, the units used to measure light and polarization.  Interference, holography and other areas that affect light as it propagates through different media are studied.  Prerequisite:  MAR 121.  2 credit hours.

MAR  125  Applied Electronics.  This course introduces and develops the concepts necessary to analyze and test both discrete and integrated circuit components.  The first half of the semester is devoted to Analog Circuits, the second to Digital Electronic.  Also includes a laboratory course with experiments designed to support this course theory.  Prerequisite:  MAR 101.  4 credit hours.

MAR  150  Machine Shop Fundamentals.  This course introduces the student to mechanical blueprint reading, shop safety, bench work and layout, hand tools, measuring instruments and manual machine tools.  Technical math including fractions, unit conversions, and basic trigonometry will be introduced and developed throughout the course.  Emphasis is placed on the sequence of machining piece parts, tool selection and machine set-up and operation.  Prerequisite:  A “C” or higher in MAT 031 or SPM 030 with a passing grade or satisfactory placement score into MAT 051 or higher. 4 credit hours.

MAR  175  Machine Tool Programming.  This course is designed to give the student a complete overview on “how to” operate and program computer based industrial machining centers.  Emphasis is placed on lathe and mill programming techniques and structures, CNC controller types and overall machine operation.  Other topics discussed:  machine set-up and tooling, part set-up and inspection and MDI programming.  Prerequisite:  MAR 150.  4 credit hours.

MAR  190  Internship I.  The internship is comprised of 320 hours of work experience in a manufacturing or laser applications setting requiring the student to perform a variety of tasks.  The student is expected to apply learned skills to be a productive employee, and the employer is expected to provide an environment that enhances the student’s exposure to the industry.  Prerequisite:  Department Chair approval.  4 credit hours.

MAR  191  Machine Tool Operations.  This course is a continuation of MAR 150 and is designed to give the student more “hands-on” machining time.  Basic manual machine tools, such as the lathe and mill, will be used to fabricate numerous basic and intermediate projects to specific dimensions and tolerances.  Machining Certificate Only.  Prerequisite:  MAR 150.  4 credit hours.

MAR  202  Laser System Design.  Students will study solid state, semiconductor, atomic gas and molecular lasers in detail, including power supply circuits for each different type.  Laser system accessories, including acousto-, electro- and mageneto-optic components will be covered and utilized in a laboratory setting.  Students will also be required to build a laser cavity and optimize the output power of that system utilizing information obtained in lecture.  Prerequisites:  MAR 123, MAR 125, MAR 175, and MAT 115.  4 credit hours.

MAR  204  PLC Programming.  This course includes a review of number systems, Programmable Logic Control addressing, use of software, system control and an in depth study of ladder logic programming.  Programming topics include:  discrete and analog inputs and outputs, internal registers and tables, editing, timers, counters, comparison functions, computational functions, data move functions, subroutines, data manipulation and sequencing functions, high speed counting, trigonometric and advanced math functions.  Laboratory exercises are provided to enhance classroom topics.   Prerequisites:  MAR 118 and MAR 125.  4 credit hours.

MAR  205  Photonics Applications.  This course provides exposure to the various industrial, medical and military laser applications and includes the use of fiber optics in telecommunications.  Students will work in a team environment to conduct experiments that demonstrate the various applications for photonics.  Prerequisites:  MAR 123 and MAR 125.  Corequisite:  MAT 115.  3 credit hours.

MAR  206  Industrial Robotics.  The course is an introduction to state-of-the-art industrial robotics.  The course is focused on installation, repair and maintenance of robots and robotic manufacturing systems.  Robotic mechanisms and sensors will be reviewed along with interfacing and programming of the controls to perform intermediate manufacturing tasks.  Corequisite:  MAR 204.  4 credit hours.

MAR  208  Computer Aided Machining.  This course introduces the student, through hands-on experience, the basics of CAD (Computer Aided Drafting) and CAM (Computer Aided Machining).  The student will design numerous projects, generate machine tool programs, DNC interface with CNC machine tools and fabricate their designs to reality.  Prerequisite:  MAR 175.  4 credit hours.

MAR  210  Materials Processing with Lasers.  This course studies the various materials that can be processed by a laser beam.  The students will work in teams to study and demonstrate the effects that a laser beam has on the respective material.  Prerequisites:  MAR 123 and MAR 125.  Corequisite:  MAT 115.  3 credit hours.

MAR  211  Theory of Industrial Automation.  This course includes a definition of Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) and provides a foundation for its application.  Concepts covered include manufacturing product planning, production engineering, production planning, control, and execution.  A definition of flexible manufacturing gives the student an insight into the factory of the future.  Current employment trends will be discussed.  Each student will be prepared to seek employment.  This course will be oriented toward choosing, planning for, and conducting the final project on the CIM cell.  Project Management software will be taught and utilized.  Prerequisite:  Department Chair approval.  2 credit hours.

 MAR  215  Introduction to Quality Control.  This course serves as an introduction to quality for students who are pursuing careers in manufacturing technology or related technical fields.  Topics include fundamentals of statistics, control chart variables and attributes, reliability, quality costs, sampling plans, and probability.  Prerequisite:  MAR 150.  3 credit hours.

MAR  218  Computer Interfacing.  This course introduces the use of personal computers for data and control in an industrial environment.  Applications using common personal computers, “off-the-shelf” components and interfacing boards will be discussed.  Also includes a laboratory course with experiments designed to support computer interfacing.  Prerequisite:  MAR 118.  3 credit hours.

MAR  220  Laser System Troubleshooting.  This course is designed to provide a comprehensive knowledge of the methods used to troubleshoot and repair problems that occur with laser equipment and its operation.  Hands on experience is emphasized.  Skill using tools and measurement equipment is developed.  Prerequisites:  MAR 202 and MAR 210.  3 credit hours.

MAR  221  Mechanical and Electronic Device Troubleshooting.  This course will emphasize the troubleshooting, repair, and maintenance of automation devices such as robots, CNC machining centers, positioning tables, and PLC control systems.  Students will be instructed on factory recommended procedures and will be expected to apply proper procedures to different types of industrial equipment.  Prerequisites:  MAR 118, MAR 204, MAR 206, and MAR 208.  3 credit hours.

MAR  231  CIM Applications.  This course is project oriented.  The students are required to design a project to be manufactured in the laboratory CIM cell.  The student will program the robots at each workstation, program the PLCs, establish the production plan and routing, design and make the necessary tooling and program the CNC machines to manufacture the product.  The students will wire the components necessary to run the cell.  Teamwork will be emphasized.  The students will be expected to utilize all previous courses to accomplish the production of the project.  The students will compose a written report of the final project.  Prerequisite:  MAR 211.  4 credit hours.

MAR 299  Special Topics in Automation & Robotics Technology.  Special Topics in Automation & Robotics Technology (MAR) may include instruction on topics not covered in other MAR courses.  Topics covered in other MAR courses may also be covered in more depth in this special topics course.  Projects may be undertaken in any area related to the major program with credit hours determined by the level and amount of involvement.  The minimum involvement required for one credit is 30 contact hours.  The specific topic(s), objectives, plan of instruction, and evaluation criteria must be documented in the syllabus; approved by the Department/Division Chair; and filed in the Academic Records Office.  Students may complete more than one Special Topics course, provided that the credits earned in this manner do not exceed a total of four (4) credits.  Prerequisite:  Department Chair approval.  1-4 credit hours.






Getting Started
Academic Programs
Transferring Credits
Electronic Brochure
College Prep
Admissions Requirements
How to Apply
Schedule Campus Tour
Schedule of Classes
College Catalogs
Student Handbook

Cost
Tuition and Fees
Scholarships
Financial Aid
Tuition Waivers
Net Price Calculator

Student Services
Academic Resource Center
Activity Center
Bookstore
Career Services
Counseling Center
Drug Screening
Library
Living On Campus
Student Life

Adult and Continuing Education and Customized Training Opportunities

 
Email the Webmaster View our Facebook page